Arthur Camins, a retired science educator, poses a question that everyone should answer.

He asks: What if our basic needs were met, as they are in some other countries?

He writes:

Step back from the day-to-day slog to meet your pressing needs. Put aside the daily onslaught of depressing bad news. Take a deep breath to take five away from the insecurity of its all.

Imagine what life would be like if the needs of you, your family, friends, and community were met. What if you didn’t have to worry about any of it?

Step back from the day-to-day slog to meet your pressing needs.  Put aside the daily onslaught of depressing bad news. Take a deep breath to take five away from the insecurity of its all.

Imagine what life would be like if the needs of you, your family, friends, and community were met. What if you didn’t have to worry about any of it?

What would it change if ….

  • the cost of high-quality health care was not an issue for anyone?
  • no one had to choose between going to work and taking care of themselves and their families when sick?
  • a decent place to live was assured to everyone?
  • all schools got the same resources as upper middle-class schools?
  • public post-secondary education was free to all?
  • paying for food, clothing, and care were not an issue for any seniors?
  • all work was respected and was paid with a living wage?
  • clean energy was assured in the near future for our children and grandchildren?

What if we were not alone in dealing with all of it?

Pie in the sky? It’s not possible? Not so, fast. A lot of folks in a lot of other countries get some, most, or all these needs met. In the U.S. none of it is assured.

It’s not just that. Unmet needs fester, driving insecurity, toxic resentment, and helplessness.

Shifting that dynamic is all about organizing to shift who has voice and power. It is all about a shift perspective from, “I wish I had that,” to “That is my right!” And then, “We demand it.”

To achieving it, we need to know what we are up against. A recent example: Dismissing the voices of workers, Congress just preemptively stepped in to settle a private labor dispute ahead of a potential strike–undermining the only leverage unions have, withholding their labor–without even stipulating the modest demand for seven paid sick days. Railroad owners won. Railroad workers lost. Elected Democratic and Republican lawmakers regularly prioritize the voice and power of corporations and the wealthy over that of workers and their families.

Another: With a writ of certiorari, the Supreme Court appears to be preemptively poised to take up a case that may block President Biden’s modest student-debt relief program ahead of the customary wait for lower court rulings. Lenders will win. Students will lose.

The list of such examples is just too long. Why? Campaign contributions, surely. But not only.

Please open the link and read on.