Mitchell Robinson, chairman of the music department at Michigan State University in East Lansing, read the story about the decision by the Justice Department to stop sending inmates to privately-managed prisons, and it occurred to him that private prisons are similar to privately managed charter schools.

Here are comparisons:

Consider the following chilling parallels between charters and private prisons:

Private prisons house 12% of inmates nationally
Charter schools enroll 6% of students nationally

Private prisons are not locally managed or controlled
Charter schools are not locally managed or controlled

Private prisons do not provide the same level of correctional services, programs and resources as government-managed correctional facilities
Charter schools do not provide the same level of educational services, programs and resources (i.e., special education, music, art, library, social workers, school psychologists, school nurses) as public schools

Private prisons are not subject to the same level or degree of regulation and oversight as government correctional facilities
Charter schools are not subject to the same level or degree of regulation and oversight as public schools

Privately contracted prisons reported more incidents of inmate contraband, higher rates of assaults and more uses of force than facilities run by the Federal Bureau of Prisons
Charter schools, like Success Academy and KIPP, have been reported as having more incidents of student suspensions, higher rates of student misbehavior due to draconian behavior policies and expectations, and troubling incidents of teacher abuse (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/13/nyregion/success-academy-teacher-rips-up-student-paper.html?_r=0) than the public schools in their communities