Politico has a brief roundup of the 2018 teacher actions:

http://go.politicoemail.com/?qs=42211ea26a63ff96a6a173ebf69fc016555c413b9e45a65e332b1e79da7b4d7986f9937834dc8a6fc4ecbdd0a7304a90

TEACHER STRIKES – A GUIDE TO THE SPRING UPRISING: A free lunch and retail-store discounts await educators in honor of National Teacher Appreciation Day. But this year, the quasi-holiday comes amid a heated national debate over how much a teacher’s work is worth.

– West Virginia’s statewide teacher strike in February appeared to be an isolated event. But after teachers in the Mountain State claimed a 5 percent raise, educators in other states took heed. Demonstrations and some concessions followed in Kentucky, Oklahoma, Colorado and Arizona. Now the question is, will the #RedForEd movement maintain its momentum?

– On the results so far: Teachers have won pay bumps and education funding increases, but state legislatures haven’t met all their demands. For example, Arizona Republicans last week codified a 20 percent raise for teachers by the year 2020 and a $100 million education funding boost. That’s well below the $1 billion teachers wanted to make up for cuts since the Great Recession. In Oklahoma, teachers ended their walkout last month when it became clear they likely wouldn’t be able to squeeze any more money out of state lawmakers this year. They walked away with a $6,000 raise – below their $10,000 ask – and a quarter of their request for new education funding. Teachers in West Virginia have no guarantees that their health insurance costs won’t go up after a year.

– Coming up: North Carolina is likely to be the site of the next mass teacher work stoppage, for one day at least. As the North Carolina General Assembly begins work on a budget, the state’s largest school districts are planning to close May 16 as teachers rally at the state Capitol. They plan to ask lawmakers to boost per-pupil spending and teacher pay. Union officials say the demonstrations will last just one day without the possibility of a longer work stoppage, and will focus on “standing up to a general assembly that has … given tax breaks to the wealthy while starving our public schools.”