Laura Chapman writes:

Clayton Christensen’s ideas as interpreted by others for K-12 education are not original but part of the ritual promotion of tech as always better than human judgment and teacher collective bargaining as collaboration gone wrong.

Here is an example of actual disruption, mislabeled “Partnership for Educational Justice.” Begin quote from Politico.

By Caitlin Emma | 09/06/2017 10:00 AM EDT With help from Kimberly Hefling, Mel Leonor and Benjamin Wermund

EXCLUSIVE: GROUPS TEAM UP TO MAKE BIGGER MARK: Two reform groups are teaming up to drive change in state education policy by using the courts. The nonprofit 50CAN is joining forces with the Partnership for Educational Justice, a nonprofit founded by former CNN anchor Campbell Brown, which is known for lawsuits targeting state policies the group says allow ineffective teachers to remain in the classroom. The partnership will allow 50CAN to get involved in litigation for the first time. And it will allow the Partnership’s small staff to draw on 50CAN’s policy expertise to better determine where lawsuits might be successful.

The Partnership for Educational Justice will retain its name and pro bono legal help, but 50CAN will serve as PEJ’s fiduciary board. Both organizations will continue their push against teacher tenure laws in three states – Minnesota, New Jersey and New York – and may look at litigation on other issues, like school funding.

“50CAN has never done any impact litigation work, so we see an opportunity to provide the backend support for their work in a way that helps them go further,” said 50CAN CEO Marc Porter Magee. “I really think the next set of successes in education reform are going to come from these kinds of collaborations.” Ralia Polechronis, executive director of the Partnership for Educational Justice, said “the beauty of a partnership like this is that PEJ can take advantage of the policy expertise that 50CAN has at a very local level.”

The Partnership for Educational Justice has yet to prevail in lawsuits aimed at ending teacher tenure policies in Minnesota, New Jersey or New York. And the organization suffered a setback Monday when the Minnesota Court of Appeals upheld a dismissal of its lawsuit, The Star Tribune reports. Porter Magee said the lawsuits aren’t intended to bring about quick change, but are “long-term commitments.” End Quote.

So there it is, plain as day. “Successes in education reform” is defined as getting rid of teacher tenure laws. All wonderful things in education flow from this “long term commitment” to end collective bargaining among teachers.

Drive down the cost of labor by marketing tech for de-personalized learning, pay the least possible for human teachers. Teachers who will just have to get used to working at low pay without continuing contracts and erratic “on call” schedules.

Notice that teaching is also a profession dominated by women and that this effort, launched by a woman of great privilege, is marketing the legal challenges to teacher unions paid for by the “Partnership for Educational Justice.” So far, the only measure of educational justice is that the anti-union, anti-teacher have failed in the courts.

Campbell Brown and her 50Can friends are supporters of injustice for teachers. Why not just sue every union, including those for first responders, for firefighters, for police officers, for nurses, for all of the workers in civil service positions? Perhaps they will.

For the time being 50CAN will work for union-busting only for teachers.

IN case you did not know, 50CAN is an umbrella organization that enlists state and local foundations to campaign for privately managed charter schools and to close “failing” public schools so charter schools can expand.

In 2016, 50CAN merged with Michelle Rhee’s StudentsFirst to push for charter schools, and the five week wonder “Teach for America” temps passed off as if well prepared teachers, and other schemes to demolish public schools and teacher unions…not merely disrupt them. So these three groups– StudentsFirst, 50Can, and The Partnership for Educational Justice are now working in concert, as partners, to destroy public education and treat teachers as disposable temps as if this agenda is a matter of securing “educational justice.” Let’s call it a good example of Trumpianism with alt-fact labeling of the whole “partnership” effort.