Sharon R. Higgins, an Oakland parent and blogger, questions
whether there is a STEM cris and offers documentation for her
views. She writes: The STEM alarm is definitely a manufactured
crisis. 1. “As the push to train more young people in STEM —
science, technology, engineering and math — careers gains steam, a
few prominent skeptics are warning that it may be misguided — and
that rhetoric about the USA losing its world pre-eminence in
science, math and technology may be a stretch.” (“Scientist
shortage? Maybe not.” USA Today, 7/9/2009,
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-07-08-science-engineer-jobs_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip
2. “’There is no scientist shortage,’ says Harvard University
economist Richard Freeman, a leading expert on the academic labor
force.” (from “Does the U.S. Produce Too Many Scientists?”
Scientific American, 2/22/2010),
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=does-the-us-produce-too-m&sc=WR_20100224
3. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the top 20
fastest growing occupations, only one is STEM-related (biomedical
engineers). http://www.bls.gov/ooh/fastest-growing.htm 4. According
to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the top 20 occupations
w/highest projected numeric change in employment, ZERO are
STEM-related). http://www.bls.gov/ooh/most-new-jobs.htm 5. The STEM
push ignores the subtleties. According to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, some STEM occupations have job outlooks that are
“faster than average” but many fall into the “average” or “slower
than average” category. 6. The Gulen Movement has cleverly taken
advantage of the STEM push for its charter school expansion. ALL
their schools boast about having a STEM emphasis. Just one example
is with Harmony Public Schools, the Texas chain.
http://www.harmonytx.org/AboutUs/TSTEMatHarmony.aspx